Author: Ralph Lowerson

Applying for Principal Fellowship

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Applying for Principal Fellowship

Hi, my name is Nicky Meer and I am a Senior Lecturer in Academic Development within AQD. On September 15th 2017 I was awarded a Principal Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy (PFHEA) and this blog is written to give you a better understanding of the process of applying for PFHEA and what you need to do.

The application is not very long at 7-8000 words in total. In order to achieve a PFHEA you must be able to demonstrate and evidence: ‘a sustained record of effective strategic leadership in academic practice and academic development as a key contribution to high quality student learning’. How you do this and the examples that you use are unique to you and your work activities, no two applications are the same but you will all have to complete the process which is in three parts:

  1. Record of Educational Impact (REI)

This is simply a list and timeline of all of your significant achievements, activities, responsibilities etc. that demonstrate your leadership and the strategic nature of your work within learning and teaching in Higher Education. In my application I included activities such as gaining HEA institutional accreditation, my VC awards for excellence in learning and teaching, my external examiner roles and my pedagogic publications and conferences etc. You may want to include projects that you lead on, areas of decision-making you are involved in, international and/or partnership work or similar. All of the activities listed here will form the narrative (RAP) in part two.

  1. Reflective Account of Practice (RAP)

The bulk of your application is a reflective narrative of the significant activities as listed in your REI. This is split into four sections with the maximum word limit being 2000 for each section. Within this narrative you must evidence all the criteria for D4 as per the UK Professional Standards Framework (https://www.heacademy.ac.uk/ukpsf).

  1. Three Advocate Statements

Your application is authenticated by the inclusion of three advocate statements from people who are familiar with your work and who have read your application and will support your claim. These statements are very important and there are detailed guidelines to help your advocates write them effectively. Your advocates must meet the following criteria between them: Be a Fellow (Senior or Principal), be able to comment on the ways in which you have directly influenced their own practice, be external to your institution and be from a Higher Education provider. Getting these statements is difficult. I asked six people and luckily got three back pretty quickly and used them, I am still waiting for one a month after I gained accreditation!

If you are interested in applying for PFHEA, please contact me for an informal chat and advice (n.meer@cumbria.ac.uk) I look forward to seeing many more PFHEA at the University of Cumbria.

Inclusive learning and teaching resources

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In light of the funding changes for students with disabilities we have developed a working collection of resources, ideas, support, reports and case studies about inclusive practice in Higher Education. It has been developed from a project to support academic staff following the changes to the Disabled Student Allowance. The purpose of resource is to enhance and improve the ways we design and deliver teaching, leading to accessible learning for all our students.

There are a range of practical activities for you to use in various settings such as large group teaching, assessment and giving feedback. There are links to comprehensive resources collected from other universities, reports from the HEA (Higher Education Academy) and a section containing information from recent conferences about inclusive practice.

The case studies section is a work in progress. We hope this is where academic staff will contribute research/ideas or practical activities that can be shared across all departments. Examples of case studies from Sheffield University have been included in this section as a starting point. A case study template has been emailed to departments or you can download it from the site.

The site is designed so that it can be easily updated and modified. We hope that with your support the wealth of experience here at the University of Cumbria this site will expand and develop over time.

University’s authentic crime scene exercise shortlisted for excellence award

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The University of Cumbria has been shortlisted for the Collaborative Award for Teaching Excellence (CATE). The CATE award recognises outstanding contributions to teaching by teams at higher education institutions demonstrating ‘excellent practice’, teamwork, and dissemination planning. Teams will need to show they are working in collaboration with direct student involvement in their work.

The University of Cumbria is represented by its Major Incident (MI) team, which brings together forensic science, policing and paramedic practice departments to provide professional, problem-based learning to students in the form of an annual mock crime investigation incident staged in real time over three days. The collaboration facilitates ‘hi-fidelity authenticity’ which cannot be created individually, and enhances opportunities for students to develop employability skills realistic to their professional vocation.

For more information, click here to read the news article on the UoC Website.

Disability Support For Students: A quick reference guide

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The recent change in funding for disabled students has placed greater emphasis on individual lecturers to provide equal opportunities enabling all students to access high quality teaching.

This quick reference guide has been created to help you understand the support for disabled students as they declare a disability, and answers questions you may have about your role in their learning.

Quick Ideas for Busy Lecturers

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When designing and delivering inclusive learning have you:

· Thought about the purpose of your teaching session/series of sessions?

· Constructively aligned your teaching with assessment?

· Decided your curriculum objectives?

· Considered your teaching style in light of your learners needs?

· Offered a range of activities to meet a range of learning preferences?

This guide is designed to help you enhance your teaching and learning in inclusive practice.  The ideas are meant to assist you and are by no means exhaustive. You can use the guide to support areas where you feel you might have gaps in knowledge/skills/experience or to add to your existing practice.

Victoria Barbe – Lecturer in Musical Theatre and Singing, Performing Arts & Sylvia Grainger – Student Enterprise Co-ordinator, Enterprise and Business Development

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Victoria Barbe & Sylvia Grainger reflect on this years FEST, held in Carlisle on 20th June 2017

With a continued desire to learn, we found this year’s Learning and Teaching Festival to be a hot bed of knowledge from across a wide range of courses and academics.

It was a fantastic day, and it was great to hear about all the amazing things that are happening around the University, and to be able to learn from them for the future.  Having the students attending the day to talk about their experiences and the positive ‘real life’ journey they have been on and how their time at UoC has changed their life was amazing. It just shows what can be achieved with the right support.

All the presentations we attended were extremely interesting, although of particular inspiration for us was hearing about the achievements of ‘Foundation Year’ students in the presentation delivered by Kathryn Hoyle; including an impressive amount of funding raised for the different charities.

Attending the day gave us the opportunity to share some of the work which we had undertaken with the BA (Hons) Performing Arts students during the year.  Some of the sessions pushed the students outside their comfort zone, but with support, they all found it enjoyable and beneficial. There have also been some impressive outcomes from it, with innovative business ventures in the pipeline.
Reflecting in depth upon the student feedback for this module gave us the opportunity, alongside locating areas for development, to realise just how much the confidence of the students was facilitated!  It was also very helpful to receive feedback from colleagues following our presentation. We are looking forward to doing so much more with this particular project, and Sylvia is particularly looking forward to enabling more Student Enterprise activities across the University next year.

Time now to reflect on what we have heard during the day and to consider how we can incorporate some of the ideas into our own future practices.

All in all a great day for sharing and learning. Thank you!

Reflections on Learning and Teaching Fest 2017 – John Pearson – Lecturer in Technical Theatre, Performing Arts

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John Pearson profile photoThis is the second time I’ve presented at the event; in 2015 I presented jointly with colleagues from LiSS and the BIC on an enterprise day we ran for my Technical Theatre students. This time, my presentation was rooted in research undertaken for the PG Cert in Learning and Teaching in HE, which I completed last year. 

I find the Festival to be a good place to pick up (mostly practical) techniques which colleagues are using with their students, or methods by which colleagues are using the systems and tools at our disposal in interesting ways; Tina Harvey’s presentation on Peer Feedback at level four was interesting to me for this reason, as I seek to find more effective and efficient ways to help students develop and become reflective and self-critical. 

One of the highlights of most years I have attended are the Lecturer of the Year/ Most Creative Teaching Keynotes, and Grace Hurford & Nicola Kitchen’s was no different; however, I suspect it might take quite a lot for me to contemplate dressing up as someone in a scene from Alien in order to engage my students.  

My presentation this year focussed on the delivery of feedback to students as audio recording; and the possible benefits that can bring. The presentation was focussed primarily as a guide to the benefits, practicalities and pitfalls of pursuing such methods for other staff, and I hope some attendees found it helpful in that way. I certainly was grateful to have some interesting follow-up questions and observations from attendees; albeit slightly tangential in places! You can read more about the basic premise of my talk in my previously published iLEAD post here [link to post]. 

Regrettably, the modules upon which I had primarily implemented audio feedback have been discontinued. As my teaching subsequently alters focus towards students on other modules, I am in a position to reflect upon how those modules could be delivered and supported, and I intend to implement lessons learnt from this work and the sessions I attend at LTFest within their delivery. 

John Pearson

John.Pearson@cumbria.ac.uk

 

Reflections on Learning and Teaching Fest 2017-Dr Davina Hill-Lecturer in Zoology

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Reflections on Learning and Teaching Fest 2017

Davina Hill

The UoC Learning and Teaching Fest is an annual celebration of some of the most innovative and effective practices taking place across the institution. As a relative newcomer to the University, taking up a Lectureship in Zoology in August 2016, this year’s L&T Fest was my first. I was keen to discover more about new learning technologies and creative ways to engage students, which are particular interests I’ve been exploring as part of the PgCert in Learning and Teaching for Higher Education. As part of my studies, I carried out an action research project on how the free interactive software programme, Mentimeter, can be used to improve student engagement, and was fortunate to have the opportunity to present this work at the event.

The L&T Fest opened with introductions from Esther Jubb, Principal Lecturer in Academic Development, and our Vice Chancellor, Julie Mennell. To celebrate the theme of the conference, Student Success, Julie asked the Heads of Department to pick out a few student success stories. The proud Heads offered far more stories than Julie perhaps bargained for. For me the highlight of the introductions was listening to the reflections of three students, Rob, Chloe and Zoe, on their undergraduate or postgraduate journeys. They explained how the tuition and opportunities they had experienced during their time at UoC helped them to develop the confidence, abilities and perspectives to achieve things they had not considered possible and to become their ‘best possible selves’.

This was a moving reminder of why many of us chose to work in Higher Education. It must have been a tough act to follow for even our Keynote Speaker, Ruth Pilkington, Professorial Fellow in Learning and Teaching at Liverpool Hope University. In a thought-provoking talk on Developing as an Academic in HE 2020, Ruth considered what is required for us as individuals to achieve teaching excellence in a changing sector.

After coffee, the conference split into five parallel sessions. In the first of these, I gained practical tips from Lisa Smith and Sarah Ruston on using Blackboard blogs to manage student learning, which I am keen to try for myself in the coming year. Liz Bates gave an interesting talk on improving the postgraduate experience, concluding that the learning community, work-life balance and support from staff, family and friends were key.

Feeling refreshed from a delicious buffet lunch, we reunited for a very engaging, funny and humble keynote by Grace Hurford and Nicola Kitchen, Lecturer of the Year and recipient of Most Creative Teaching Award of the Year, respectively. They showed that problems can be turned into opportunities, challenged the audience to use teamwork to lower a stick to the ground balanced on a finger, and described how transforming the classroom into the backdrop of a science fiction film can inspire scientific problem-solving skills. Most of all, they encouraged us to be original and to take risks. Leaving us in no doubt that they practice what they preach, they finished by singing about their ‘Favourite Things’ in academia to the tune of the song from the Sound of Music.

Grace and Nicola’s interactive keynote set the scene perfectly for my talk that followed on how the interactive presentation software, Mentimeter, can be used to promote student engagement. This was a joint presentation with Kelly Fielden, Lecturer in Occupational Therapy. With the help of our audience we demonstrated how two different functions of the software (multiple choice quizzes and asking the lecturer anonymous questions) can be used within a lecture setting. We showed how our students, across different disciplines, levels and Mentimeter contexts, agreed that the software adds value to lectures and all recommended that it be used again.

Next up were Julie Taylor, David Wright and Andrea Charters, who provided a really useful talk on how marking rubrics can be used to provide a wealth of focussed feedback, improve consistency between and within marker, save marking time and enhance the student experience. I have been using simple spreadsheet rubrics for marking some of my own assignments and now feel equipped to try this through Blackboard. Finally, Charlotte Hardacre gave an excellent and very enthusiastic talk on her experiences of student-led teaching. She (bravely, I would say) alternated the delivery of a module between herself and different groups of students. This encouraged students to prepare for class more effectively because student ‘teachers’ were more actively involved in learning and were well placed to pester their peers to do the reading to ensure their session worked well. I was particularly interested in the idea that the intervention fostered critical thinking because students were less accepting of material delivered to them by their peers.

The L&T Fest was a really positive experience because it offered plenty of ideas and practical guidance to try out in the next academic year. It provided opportunities to speak with colleagues from different disciplines that I wouldn’t otherwise have met. Most of all, I was struck by how many enthusiastic, talented and creative people we have in our institution that are striving to provide the best student experience through teaching and support.

Developing digital capabilities of students and staff – Kelly Fielden -Health, Psychology & Social Studies

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Kelly Fielden Photo

I attended the Learning and Teaching Fest 2017 for a variety of reasons. One – I went last year and found it very informative for my teaching development. Two – I love finding out what others are doing and like the opportunity for time to “think”. Three – (and probably the biggest reason!) I was one of the presenters. This was my first time presenting at a conference, so it was a great learning experience! One of the biggest highlights of the day was the morning talk from three successful students. The students kindly provided us with an overview of their various educational journeys and most importantly, laid down the gauntlet for academics to “keep it real” and keep learning accessible. They were all truly inspirational and provided such a positive outlook on their journeys through the University of Cumbria. Next, Ruth Pilkington provided some very valuable food for thought on learning and teaching within a changing landscape. In addition, she encouraged academics to be entrepreneurs and to see problems as opportunities. Thank you to both the student and Ruth for their thoughtful and motivating talks. Following this event, I will aim to ensure that I keep my teaching accessible and maintain a “real world” focus for all learners to ensure students employability and entrepreneurship when they graduate. For a start, I am going to begin a journal club for students who will be undertaking their first research module in the new academic year – an activity which often happens in occupational therapy practice. I will also continue to use some of my scholarly leave to revisit clinical practice and maintain essential skills and networks.

 

The session I conducted jointly with Dr Davina Hill (Lecturer in Zoology) reported on our respective PGCert Learning and Teaching in Higher Education action research studies. My particular study investigated student’s perceptions on the use of Mentimeter (a technology enhanced learning tool) to ask anonymous questions in class. We had a great session demonstrating the use of Mentimeter and reporting on our studies which concluded that students do value the use of Mentimeter in class. Thank you to all those who attended!

 

Thank you to the AQD Team for the great day – I cannot wait to attend next year!

 

Kelly Fielden

Lecturer in Occupational Therapy

PIP WORKSHOP: A Study utilising photo elicitation to explore the student experience, Liz Bates

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Dr Elizabeth Bates shares her presentation from a recent pedagogy in practice session aimed to explore how staff motivate and encourage students to get involved in the wider university community.

Liz BatesThe slides contain a brief overview of a study exploring the student experience using photo elicitation, before guiding attendees through a discussion of student satisfaction, extracurricular activities and employability.

Click here to view the slides in PDF format.